Central Texas Property Taxes & Appraisal Districts

Property Taxes & Appraisal Districts

Notice of Appraised Value of your property:

Tax Code Section 25.19 requires the chief appraiser to send the notice of appraised value between April 1 to May 1 for residence homesteads, or as soon after that as possible. If you disagree with this value, you, as the property owner, may file a protest with the appraisal review board (ARB). This protest must be filed on or before May 31st. The notice of appraised value includes a protest form and information about how and when to file a protest with the ARB if the property owner disagrees with the appraisal district's actions. Learn more at Texas Comptroller Office Appraisal Protests and Appeals.

 Homestead Exemptions and How to File:
What is a Homestead Exemption? Homestead exemptions are granted by the county appraisal district where the property is located. The exemption reduces a homeowner’s property tax bill by removing part of the home's value from taxation. All Texas homeowners may receive a General Residence Homestead Exemption of $25,000 on the value of their property for school taxes. Other taxing entities may also offer exemptions of some percentage of the home’s value. Other exemptions are available to homeowners who are over 65 or disabled, and require the same application process. Learn more at Property Tax Exemptions at Texas Comptroller office site with more information and how to apply for the exemptions. You also can get the forms & more information on each County Appraisal Districts Site. 

Valuing PropertyEach county’s appraisal district determines the value of all taxable property within the county. Before the appraisals begin, the district compiles a list of taxable property. The listing for each property contains a description and the name and address of the owner.

The appraised home value for a homeowner who qualifies his or her homestead for exemptions in the preceding and current year may not increase more than 10 percent per year.

Property Tax Code Section 23.23(a) sets a limit on the appraised value of a residence homestead, stating that its appraised value for a tax year may not exceed the lesser of: (1) the market value of the property; or (2) the sum of: (A) 10 percent of the appraised value of the property for last year; (B) the appraised value of the property for last year; and (C) the market value of all new improvements to the property, excluding a replacement structure for one that was rendered uninhabitable or unusable by a casualty or by mold or water damage. The appraisal limitation first applies in the year after the homeowner qualifies for the homestead exemption.

Property Value and Evaluation

How is your property valued?The appraisal district must repeat its appraisal process for property at least once every three years.To save time and money, the appraisal district uses mass appraisal to appraise large numbers of properties. In a mass appraisal, the district first collects detailed descriptions of each taxable property in the district. It then classifies properties according to a variety of factors, such as size, use and construction type. Using data from recent property sales, the district appraises the value of typical properties in each class. Taking into account differences such as age or location, the district uses “typical” property values to appraise all the properties in each class.

The appraisal district may use three common methods to value property: the market, income and cost approaches.

Property Location, Condition and Size

The market approach is most often used and simply asks, “What are properties similar to this property selling for?” The value of your home is an estimate of the price your home would sell for on Jan. 1. The appraisal district compares your home to similar homes that have sold recently and determines your home’s value.

Other methods are used to appraise types of properties that don’t often sell, such as utility companies and oil leases. The income approach asks, “What would an investor pay in anticipation of future income from the property?” The cost approach asks, “How much would it cost to replace the property with one of equal utility

How your property is valued and who does it?
Each county’s appraisal district determines the value of all taxable property within the county. Before the appraisals begins, the district compiles a list of taxable properties. The listing for each property contains a description and the name and address of the owners. The appraised home value for a homeowner who qualifies his or her homestead for exemptions in the preceding and current year may not increase more than 10 percent per year.

Property Tax Code Section 23.23(a) sets a limit on the appraised value of a residence homestead, stating that its appraised value for a tax year may not exceed the lesser of: (1) the market value of the property; or (2) the sum of: (A) 10 percent of the appraised value of the property for last year; (B) the appraised value of the property for last year; and (C) the market value of all new improvements to the property, excluding a replacement structure for one that was rendered uninhabitable or unusable by a casualty or by mold or water damage. The appraisal limitation first applies in the year after the homeowner qualifies for the homestead exemption. Contact us with any questions.

How often your property valued?
The appraisal district must repeat its appraisal process for property at least once every three years. To save time and money, the appraisal district uses mass appraisal to appraise large numbers of properties. In a mass appraisal, the district first collects detailed descriptions of each taxable property in the district. It then classifies properties according to a variety of factors, such as size, use and construction type. Using data from recent property sales, the district appraises the value of typical properties in each class. Taking into account differences such as age or location, the district uses “typical” property values to appraise all the properties in each class. Contract us with any questions.

Which Method Use for Appraisal

Which Method Appraisal Districts use to value the property?
The appraisal district may use three common methods to value property: the market, income and cost approaches. The market approach is most often used and simply asks, “What are properties similar to this property selling for?” The value of your home is an estimate of the price your home would sell for on January 1, they use sales date up to that point combined with value or neighboring properties around your property which are comparable. The appraisal district compares your home to similar homes that have sold recently and determines your home’s value. Other methods are used to appraise types of properties that do not have sell comps, such as utility companies and oil leases. The income approach uses the income from the property or similar propeties, the question the ask “What would an investor pay in anticipation of future income from the property?” The cost approach asks, “How much would it cost to replace the property with one of equal utility?”. Cost approach also can be used for new construction if there are no recent sales or comparble properties to use. If you have any questions contact us, we are here to help you with your real estate needs any way we can.

Central Texas County Map

List of Appraisal District in Central Texas: 

Atascosa County 
(830) 742-3591
Bastrop County
(512) 303-1930
Bexar County
(210) 224-8511
Blanco County 
(830) 868-4013
Burnet County 
(512) 756-8291
Caldwell County 
(512) 398-5550
Comal County 
(830) 625-8597
 Fayette County
(979) 968-8383
 Guadalupe County
(830) 303-3313

 Hays County
(512) 268-2522

 Kendall County
(830) 249-8012
 Medina County
(830) 741-3035
 Travis County
(512) 834-9317
 Williamson County
(512) 930-3787

The Texas Competroller Site is great resource with information about taxes in Texas and tax payer's rights.

Roya Johson and her family have been homeowners and investors in Austin real estate since 1970's. Her family has grown with Austin. As active homeowner, investor and one the top producing real estate Brokers in Austin since 1983 Roya Johnson understands property values in Greater Austin area, and she can put her knewledage to work for you,  Contact us, we know Austin real estate and can help you with your real estate needs.

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Roya Johnson
Roya Johnson

Keller Williams Realty
Austin, TX 78703

512.472.1000
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